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Alchemy Acres Menagerie

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Silent Sentinels
Jumping Jack Flash - At the Ole Fishin Hole Are we friends yet? Here at Alchemy, we have an abundance of "riches". In addition to the goats, we have a Great Pyrenees guardian dog (to look after the goats and us, natch), one cat(to eliminate mice and other varmints), a flock of chickens (ostensibly, for eggs), one guinee (voraceous insect eater), one accountant, and one retired analytical chemist. As an added treat, in April, three golden fluff balls (otherwise known as the Three Musketeers or Huey, Louie, and Dewie) marched up out of the front field and promptly took over the farm. They've grown into quite handsome ducks, and now assist the chickens and guinee on bug patrol. I thought they were geese at first, as they are so big. I guess none of my animals has ever been a guest at a famine, and these ducks are HUGE. Thelma, our young adult Pyr, patrols the goat pens, patrols the yard, and occasionally stomps my perennials flatter than a "flitter". We lost our elderly, beloved Patti earlier this year, but Thelma stepped up to the plate, and she sticks to the goats like glue. I'm quite proud of her. In Memorium - Louise Chick checks Kidding Box Jack, the cat, was a gift to us from our veterinarian. He had been hit by a car, and his owner wanted him euthanized. So our vet amputated his tail, fixed him all up, and gave him to us. He's been a real help by keeping the rodent population in check. Of course, I could do without his sleeping in my box of carefully preserved wildflower seeds, but that's a whole different story. In the meantime, my basement and my barn are mouse-free. The ducks, chickens and guinee are my "bug patrol". Since I got them, I have not run over a single yellow jacket nest (a real "treat") while mowing the yard or fields. And we almost never see a tick, which is unusual in our wooded area of Tennessee. We lost one of our two guinees last year. Our remaining old fellow called and called for his buddy. Anyone who believes that animals and birds don't have feelings, has never been in close proximity to one who is grieving. The remaining guinee has moved on with his life, but I will never forget his relentless search. The chickens are supposed to lay eggs for us to eat, but the little blighters hide the dad-gum things in the hay. Then the next thing you know - out they come trailing 10-15 chicks. I built them a special room in the barn for their roost, but they prefer roosting in the barn rafters right over my new Frontier pickup truck - **#####**! As to the two-legged inhabitants - well we step and fetch and otherwise wait on everyone else hand and foot. Barb is the accountant and has gone into banking, while I am a retired chemist who specialized in forensic electron and optical microscopy and asbestos analysis (optical and TEM).
Everyone SharesChickens and Guinees
Merlin and Po are Growing Nicely - and they're still Youngsters.



Sounds from the Farm

Speak, Patti! - 19.4K
Louise - Chatting with the Neighbor's Dog - 37.9K
Jumping Jack Flash - 23.6K
The Cock Croweth - 74.3K
Hens Cackling - 73.8K
Frog in the Pond - 15.4K
Goat Politely Requesting Food - 14.9K



Welcome PageDescription of Dairy HerdWhat's New at the Site?Crafts and Nifty StuffAlchemy's MenagerieTip of the MonthPrevious Tips of the MonthOther Resources of Interest

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