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Tip of the Month





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Parts of this article were first printed in the Tennessee Cooperator - the magazine of my local Co-op.The parts that were "filched" were written by David Martin. This topic of how to prepare for the cold weather seems particularly appropriate for this time of year - even here in the South. I've lived thru the cold weather of Minnesota, Michigan, Wisconsin, Illinois, Texas, and New Mexico (-40 degrees there), but the cold of Tennessee is always damp, and goes straight to the bone. So it behooves us all to take precautions for ourselves and our animals so that all and sundry remain healthy and happy.

Serious cold-related injuries and illnesses can occur when the body loses the ability to warm itself, a condition known as hypothermia. It can result in permanent tissue damage, and even death. Hypothermia can slowly overcome a person or animal whose body has been chilled by low temperatures, a brisk wind, or wet clothing (or hair-coat). The symptoms of hypothermia include fatigue, drowsiness, uncontrolled shivering, cool bluish skin (in humans), slurred speech, clumsy movements, and irratable, irrational, or confused behavior. Frostbite usually affects the extremities: fingers, toes, hands, feet, ears and nose. When deep layers of skin and tissue freeze, the skin becomes hard and numb and looks pale and waxy white. Often the only treatment for severely frostbitten flesh or limbs is amputation. For those of us with nubians, be particularly careful of those long floppy (and vulnerable) ears of which we are all so fond!! Obviously, we all want to avoid such dire consequences as amputation- both for ourselves and our animals.

As colder weather approaches, you can help to protect yourself and your charges by following the following guidelines suggested by OSHA:

So by using a large dollop of common sense, we should be able to care for our animals and farms without doing ourselves in. Hope you all had a very safe and happy holiday, and that you have a happy and peaceful New Year. We'll "see" you all next month.


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Welcome PageDescription of Dairy HerdWhat's New at the Site?Crafts and Nifty StuffAlchemy's MenagerieTip of the MonthPrevious Tips of the MonthOther Resources of Interest