Make your own free website on Tripod.com

Alchemy Acres
presents
Tip of the Month





Welcome PageDescription of Dairy HerdWhat's New at the Site?Crafts and Nifty StuffAlchemy's MenagerieTip of the MonthPrevious Tips of the MonthOther Resources of Interest




We've talked in the past about the care and feeding of our animals. We keep these animals because we love them and enjoy the personal interactions, but any animal which resides on a farm must earn its own way. Very few people can afford to subsidize a raftload of freeloaders. So this month we are beginning a series of articles about the financial aspects of goatkeeping. This first installment was written largely by Trish McKee when she owned and operated the Homesteader, and she has graciously allowed us to plagerize her composition.

If you buy a $300 doe kid (8 wks old) to raise as a family milker, you will probably get a full return on your investment by the end of her first lactation (about 1.75 years). The economics breaks down as follows:

If you add these costs up, you'll see that by the end of her first lactation, your doeling will have cost you $558.90. The $300 paid for the kid, although it may seem excessive to the new goat breeder, should have started you with a nice animal out of good bloodlines. This is important when it comes to marketing the end products - progeny and milk. It goes without saying that the other costs can skyrocket if you purchased an unhealthy animal or you did not take good care of your investment. Good care -in selection and care of the kid - will make or break you.

So we've covered the costs. Now let's take a closer look at the income your investment will generate:

So if you add up your income on investment, you will have grossed $742. Simple arithmatic gives us a net profit of $183. At this point, your doe has paid for herself and is ready to kid again.

I cannot emphasize how important good animal husbandry is to your realization of these profits. And these are all very conservative estimates. You can cut hay expense by use of pasture. If you purchase good stock and breed to outstanding sires, your kids should be worth considerably more than $125. And if you purchase good breeding stock, your doe should give you more milk than 5 lbs/ day - at least after the first lactation.

It is possible to turn a profit on your little goat enterprise - or at the very least avoid having your cherubs eat you out of house and home. Of course, turning a profit implies that you're able to market your product, and next month, well talk about some marketing strategies.


Write us with your comments and suggestions.


Welcome PageDescription of Dairy HerdWhat's New at the Site?Crafts and Nifty StuffAlchemy's MenagerieTip of the MonthPrevious Tips of the MonthOther Resources of Interest