Make your own free website on Tripod.com

Alchemy Acres
presents
Tip of the Month





Welcome PageDescription of Dairy HerdWhat's New at the Site?Crafts and Nifty StuffAlchemy's MenagerieTip of the MonthPrevious Tips of the MonthOther Resources of Interest




This month, we're revisiting farm safety. We've covered several aspects of this topic in earlier "Tips", but I think we can't be too safe. The older I get, the more important becomes the topic of taking care of the most important "machine" I own - namely my body. This "Tip" is an article which was written by Robin Fazio for the Tennessee Cooperator. If you haven't contacted your local Co-op, yet, do so, as I'm fairly certain your Co-op will also have one of these marvelous monthly newspapers.

While the human body is efficient and versatile, and has marvelous powers of repair and recuperation, like any other machine, improper use will cause it to break down. Back injuries are some of the most common problems caused by overexerting your body while performing your daily farming chores. For example, repeated lifting and carrying of heavy objects, prolonged driving in vehicles that jar your body, and working in adverse conditions that may cause slips, falls or other traumatic injuries put farmers at risk of back injuries.

Most back injuries are sprains and strains to ligaments or muscles, and even a minor injury increases the chance for subsequent injuries or chronic back pain. As the bones and joints of the back deteriate with age and overuse, serious injuries such as damage to the vertebrae or intervertebral discs become more likely. These injuries can result in surgery, permanent disability, and a lifetime of pain. Speaking from first-hand experience - back pain is excruciating, and you REALLY want to avoid and/or minimize it.

The majority of back injuries can be attributed to human error. Fortunately, this means that most back injuries can be prevented. You can reduce the risks of injury by redesigning work stations, staying in good physical condition, and modifying your work practices. Here are some tips to follow.

Take care of the most valuable machine on your farm - your body. I can't speak for anybody else, but farming is not only a means of earning money; it is also a lifestyle. By taking care of your body, you help ensure that you can continue to perform your farming tasks and maintain your lifestyle.


Write us with your comments and suggestions.


Welcome PageDescription of Dairy HerdWhat's New at the Site?Crafts and Nifty StuffAlchemy's MenagerieTip of the MonthPrevious Tips of the MonthOther Resources of Interest